Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "CCSS.Math.Content.HSF-LE.A.4" x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Elliott Ostler

Processes using linear measurement can be adapted to teach complex topics such as polynomial multiplication, rational exponents, and logarithms.

Restricted access

Kelly Cline, Jean McGivney-Burelle, and Holly Zullo

Voting in the classroom can engage students and promote discussion. All you need is a good set of questions.

Restricted access

Roberto López-Boada and Sandra Argüelles Daire

Students use elementary algebra concepts to solve trigonometric and logarithmic equations and systems.

Restricted access

Joseph Muller and Ksenija Simic-Muller

What happens with cat populations when they are not controlled? Consider the case of Aoshima Island in Japan. Aoshima Island is called a cat island: Its cat population is 130 and growing; its human population is 13. The cats live in colonies and are fed and cared for by people who live on the islands.

Restricted access

Melissa Geist, Holly Anthony, and Twanelle Majors

Such applications can make mathematics content relevant to students.

Restricted access

A set of problems of many types.

Restricted access

Alison L. Mall and Mike Risinger

Our favorite lesson, an interactive experiment that models exponential decay, launches with a loud dice roll. This exploration engages students in lively data collection that motivates interest in key components of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: functions, modeling, and statistics and probability (CCSSI 2010).

Restricted access

John F. Mahoney

The author presents an activity in which the lines in students' hands are analyzed, with curves and lines fit to each one.

Restricted access

Frank C. Wilson, Scott Adamson, Trey Cox, and Alan O'Bryan

Our teachers misled us, but we don't blame them. They were only teaching what was in the textbook. And as new teachers—because of our lack of experience and our reliance on the textbook—we continued to teach the procedure we had learned as students. It wasn't until we began writing textbooks ourselves (Wilson 2007; Wilson et al. forthcoming) that we were compelled to confront the inverse function falsehoods in our intellectual past. These contradictions were difficult to detect because they were broadly accepted and perpetuated in widely used textbooks

Restricted access