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Jennifer M. Suh, Padmanabhan Seshaiyer, Kristie Moore, Melissa Green, Heather Jewell, and Iris Rice

Integrating Science Technology Engineering in the Mathematics (iSTEM) is the venue for ideas and activities that stimulate student interest in these fields in K—grade 6 classrooms. This month's department features two different lessons that were planned by a group of teachers and math educators who focused on the concepts of measurement and geometry, interconnected primarily with engineering.

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Surface area and volume are explored with this cartoon, also containing an activity sheet.

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Mollie H. Appelgate, Christa Jackson, Kari Jurgenson, and Ashley Delaney

Introduce two topics in math, volume and triangle types, by using connections to STEM. Contributors to the iSTEM (Integrating Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) department share ideas and activities that stimulate student interest in the integrated fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K–grade 6 classrooms.

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This highly appropriate cartoon for March explores pi, coupled with an activity sheet.

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Kimberly Moore

Eighth-grade students use a character from Minecraft® to explore surface area and volume, resulting in the creation of a three-dimensional “Cylindrical Steve.”

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Barbara Zorin, Patricia D. Hunsader, and Denisse R. Thompson

Learn how to modify classroom evaluation items to avoid potential difficulties that limit a teacher's insight into students' mathematical understanding.

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Brandy Crowley and Tracy Harper

What is the most exciting day of the school year? Field trip day! Organizing a smooth field trip requires mathematical thinking. After solving these problems, have students create math questions about their own field-trip experiences.

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Christine Ferguson

A trip to the circus is so much fun. You will see elephants, tightrope walkers, lions, tigers, and more! But did you know that you could also learn math while you are there? Let's see how much we can learn at the circus.

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Kimberly M. Lilienthal

Exploring airport traffic, usage, hours of operation, and security statistics are all ways to model and bring relevance to math. Students soar while exploring the mathematics of aircraft: dimensions, cargo, fuel, and passenger capacity. Comparing two airports or aircraft would be valuable ways to extend their mathematical journey.