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Denise T. Johnson

Each month this section of the Problem Solvers department discusses the classroom results from using problems presented in previous issues of Teaching Children Mathematics. Find detailed submission guidelines for all departments at www.nctm.org/tcmdepartments.

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Michael Tapee, Tammy Cartmell, Tammy Guthrie, and Laura B. Kent

By orchestrating social interactions, students learn from one another about data and measures of center.

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Wayne Nirode

During their work with statistics, students should be able to compare two treatments from a randomized experiment and use a simulation to determine statistical significance informally (CCSSI 2010a; CCSSI 2010b; Franklin et al. 2007). To achieve these goals, I developed a method to collect student data in my classroom from hands-on simulations. The advantage of hands-on simulations over using formulas is that students can develop a conceptual understanding of statistical significance when they see the variation that occurs from sample to sample as the results of the experiment are rerandomized each time the simulation runs. I first explain a specific classroom experiment and the hands-on simulation. I then describe how to use Google Forms and Google Sheets to convert the simulation data that students submit using their cell phones into a single column of data that can then be displayed as a dot plot.

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Angela T. Barlow, Natasha E. Gerstenschlager, and Shannon E. Harmon

Three instructional situations demonstrate the value of using an “unknown” student's work to allow the advancement of students' mathematical thinking as well as their engagement in the mathematical practice of critiquing the reasoning of others.

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Lynn Columba

Math by the Month is a regular department of the journal featuring collections of short activities focused on a monthly theme. These articles aim for an inquiry or problem-solving orientation that includes at least four activities each for grade bands K—2, 3—4, and 5—6. This month, students will flip as they use their math skills to solve delectable problems about one of the most versatile foods on the planet. For more flapjack math, check out the “7,000 Pancakes” investigation in the May 2008 issue of TCM. Further whet students' appetites with pancake trivia from http://marthasallnatural.com/recipes_pancake_trivia.pdf.

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Liat Zippin and Lisa Englard

Math by the Month is a regular department of the journal. It features collections of short activities focused on a monthly theme. These articles aim for an inquiry or problem-solving orientation that includes at least four activities each for grade bands K—2, 3—4, and 5—6. In this issue, the problems capitalize on the natural curiosity of children to explore measurement.

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Gemma F. Mojica, Christina N. Azmy, and Hollylynne S. Lee

Concord Consortium's Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP), a free Web-based data tool designed for students in grades 6-12 and higher, is continuously being updated and developed for diverse projects in data science, science education, and mathematics/statistics education (https://codap.concord.org/). Teachers and students can access CODAP without downloading software or registering for accounts. Although some Web-based technology tools provide certain features for free and require users to pay a fee to use additional features, CODAP has no hidden costs. Devices need only be connected to the Internet using an updated Web browser (Chrome is preferred). CODAP is not optimized (yet) for use on such touchscreen devices as tablets or iPads®.

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Edited by Anna F. DeJarnette and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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Erin E. Krupa, Mika Munakata, and Karmen Yu

Can you remember your typical elementary school field day? In this article, we provide details on hosting a mathematics field day, focused on embedding rich mathematics into authentic fun-filled field day experiences.