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Wendy S. Bray and Luz A. Maldonado

Talking about a structured series or string of basic fact problems is a strategy that presents collaborative opportunities for students to explore relationships among related reasoning strategies.

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Jennifer A. Czocher, Diana L. Moss, and Luz A. Maldonado

Conventional word problems can't help students build mathematical modeling skills. on their own. But they can be leveraged! We examined how middle and high school students made sense of word problems and offer strategies to question and extend word problems to promote mathematical reasoning.

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Gladys Krause, Luz A. Maldonado Rodríguez, and Melissa Adams-Corral

Pause before responding—the “wrong way" to add might just be right.

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Wendy S. Bray, Luz A. Maldonado, and Introduction by: Desiree Y. Harrison

From the Archives highlights articles from NCTM’s legacy journals, as chosen by leaders in mathematics education.

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Luz A. Maldonado Rodríguez, Naomi Jessup, Marrielle Myers, Nicole Louie, and Theodore Chao

Elementary mathematics teacher education often draws on research-based frameworks that center children as mathematical thinkers, grounding teaching in children’s mathematical strategies and ideas and as a means to attend to equity in mathematics teaching and learning. In this conceptual article, a group of critical mathematics teacher educators of color reflect on the boundaries of Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) as a research-based mathematical instructional framework advancing equity through a sociopolitical perspective of mathematics instruction connected to race, power, and identity. We specifically discuss CGI along the dominant and critical approaches to equity outlined by , ) framework. We present strategies used to extend our work with CGI and call for the field to continue critical conversations of examining mathematical instructional frameworks as we center equity and criticality.