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Lee V. Stiff

The effects of teaching strategy, relevant knowledge, and strategy length on students' ability to learn a contrived mathematical concept were studied with 326 high school students randomly assigned to 1 of 18 treatment groups characterized by the type and length of teaching strategy and students' level of exposure to subordinate concepts and relationships. The teaching strategy and relevant knowledge effects on concept acquisition were significant; the strategy-length effect was not. Specifically, characterization strategies were more effective than exemplification strategies, and students' test performance increased as levels of relevant knowledge increased. Furthermore, exemplification moves were more effective for students with low relevant knowledge, and characterization moves were more effective for students with high relevant knowledge. The results supported John Kolb's model of concept-teaching strategies.

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Lee V. Stiff

This is one of my favorite articles because of the message it conveys: Mathematics teaching and learning is improved when we use multiple approaches to understanding important skills and procedures, concepts, and relationships.

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Lee V. Stiff

For several years now, I have been asked to share with junior and senior high school mathematics teachers in North Carolina ways to improve students' reading comprehension of word problems. My work with teachers and students has given me the opportunity to field-test several strategies for improving reading skills. One such strategy uses comprehension guides (Earle 1976; Herber 1978).

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Valerie N. Faulkner, Lee V. Stiff, Patricia L. Marshall, John Nietfeld, and Cathy L. Crossland

This study is a longitudinal look at the different mathematics placement profiles of Black students and White students from late elementary school through 8th grade. Results revealed that Black students had reduced odds of being placed in algebra by the time they entered 8th grade even after controlling for performance in mathematics. An important implication of this study is that placement recommendations must be monitored to ensure that high-achieving students are placed appropriately, regardless of racial background.