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Mimi Corcoran

Sampling experiments with different types of beads give students a memorable hands-on experience.

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Margaret Cibes and James Greenwood

Students analyze items from the media to answer mathematical questions related to the article. The mathematics in these clips includes interpretation of graphs, computing percentages, making conjectures, and analyzing data. The first clip concerns college admission, a relevant topic for many students.

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Michael Dempsey

When understood and applied appropriately, mathematics is both beautiful and powerful. As a result, students are sometimes tempted to extend that power beyond appropriate limits. In teaching statistics at both the high school and college level, I have found that one of students' biggest struggles is applying their understanding of probability to make appropriate inferences.

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Tanja Van Hecke

By examining pricing for insurance for a moped, students can explore the theory of systems of inequalities and the topic of distributions in statistics. Fair systems for determining the premium (taking into account cautious and reckless drivers) are considered.

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James R. Kett

The author uses Autograph, a powerful software program, to illustrate sampling distributions and to demonstrate the central limit theorem.

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Paul Laumakis

Students bring the real world into the classroom by studying speeding data collected on two Pennsylvania highways.

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Kelly Cline, Jean McGivney-Burelle, and Holly Zullo

Voting in the classroom can engage students and promote discussion. All you need is a good set of questions.

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Hollylynne S. Lee, Tina T. Starling, and Marggie D. Gonzalez

Research shows that students often struggle with understanding empirical sampling distributions. Using hands-on and technology models and simulations of problems generated by real data help students begin to make connections between repeated sampling, sample size, distribution, variation, and center. A task to assist teachers in implementing research-based strategies is included.

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Readers comment on published articles or offer their own ideas.

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Anne Quinn

While looking for an inexpensive Web application to illustrate the Central Limit theorem, I found the Rossman/Chance Applet Collection, a group of free Web-based statistics apps. In addition to illustrating the Central Limit theorem, the apps could be used to cover many classic statistics concepts, including confidence intervals, regression, and a virtual version of the popular Reese's® Pieces problem. The apps allow users to investigate concepts using either preprogrammed or original data.