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Dana L. Grosser-Clarkson and Joanna S. Hung

This Perspectives on Practice manuscript focuses on an innovation associated with “Engaging Teachers in the Powerful Combination of Mathematical Modeling and Social Justice: The Flint Water Task” from Volume 7, Issue 2 of MTE. The Flint Water Task has shown great promise in achieving the dual goals of exploring mathematical modeling while building awareness of social justice issues. This Perspectives on Practice article focuses on two adaptations of the task—gallery walks and What I Know, What I Wonder, What I Learned (KWL) charts—that we have found to enhance these learning opportunities. We found that the inclusion of a gallery walk supported our students in the development of their mathematical modeling skills by enhancing both the mathematical analyses of the models and the unpacking of assumptions. The KWL chart helps students document their increase in knowledge of the social justice issues surrounding the water crisis. Using the mathematical modeling cycle to explore social justice issues allows instructors to bring humanity into the mathematics classroom.

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Margaret Rathouz, Nesrin Cengiz-Phillips, and Angela S. Krebs

Issues of equity in mathematics classrooms existed prior to COVID-19. For many students, however, meaningful participation in mathematical discussions became nearly impossible in online settings during the pandemic. In this study, we note the diversity in and nature of participation in mathematical discourse in an online course for preservice teachers (PSTs). We investigate the influence of implementing two support strategies for discussion: (a) establishing a “rough-draft/revision” orientation to mathematical tasks; and (b) providing time and structure (tasks and prompts) in an online discussion board for PSTs to post their initial thoughts, react to peers’ solutions, and collectively revise their ideas. In this article, we highlight several benefits of these support strategies to equitable PST participation in a unit on number theory. For example, as compared with oral discussions where only a few PSTs offered their ideas, the written discussion format encouraged every PST to post their ideas. Using a rough-draft/revision stance in the prompts fostered sharing and revealed diverse mathematical approaches, perspectives, and ideas. We argue that giving students opportunities to interact with one another and the mathematics in a variety of ways promotes equitable participation.

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Blake E. Peterson, Douglas L. Corey, Benjamin M. Lewis, Jared Bukarau, and Introduction by: Wendy Cleaves

From the Archives highlights articles from NCTM’s legacy journals, previously discussed by the MTLT Journal Club.

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Chepina Rumsey, Jody Guarino, and Michelle Sperling

We describe how mathematical argumentation supports curiosity and exploration by sharing a first-grade lesson in which students explored decomposition with subtraction. We also reflect on the conditions that supported the inclusion of mathematical argumentation.

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Stephanie D. Sigmon, Kelly Q. Halpin, Damien J. Ettere, and Jennifer Suh

This article models how to plan and facilitate implementing the same task in two sixth-grade classrooms with two different learning goals using the Five Practices structure.

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Ashley Schmidt, Treshonda Rutledge, Tandrea Fulton, and Sarah B. Bush

Do you use mathematical discussions to increase engagement in your classroom? In this Front and Center article, authors provide a discourse tool that can be used to reveal potential biases found in the implementation of the Five Practices.

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Maria Franshaw

Mathematics abounds in the beauty of the seasons. Where you live, work, or travel, how do you engage with and explore the wonders of math in our natural world?

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Victoria R. Jacobs, Susan B. Empson, Joan M. Case, Amy Dunning, Naomi A. Jessup, Gladys Krause, and D’Anna Pynes

The authors introduce an activity involving “follow-up equations” to connect with ideas children have already expressed during fraction problem solving.

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Rachel H. Orgel

Returning to in-person learning after COVID-19, our goal was to use our district’s framework along with the CASEL 5 to help us address the social and emotional learning needs of our students without losing the integrity of the mathematics.

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Enrique Ortiz

Examine this geometric figure in light of a set of connections among fields such as architecture, geometry, science, sports, technology, and associated uses, models, and discoveries.