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Stephanie Casey and Andrew Ross

There is a lack of teacher education materials that develop equity literacy in content courses for preservice secondary mathematics teachers. In response, we created teacher education curriculum materials for introductory statistics that include an integrated focus on developing equity literacy and critical statistical literacy.

In this article, we provide an overview of our materials’ design along with a detailed look at one activity regarding racial demographics and tracking in high school STEM courses. We present evidence regarding the positive impact of these materials on the teacher candidates’ competency, value, and likelihood of applying their equity literacy and critical statistical literacy. Implications for mathematics teacher educators working to develop equity literacy together with content knowledge are discussed.

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Gavin Cunningham and Siddhi Desai

We share how engaging in the mathematical process of 3D printing captured and elevated our interest in discovering the wonder, joy, and beauty of mathematics in the world around us.

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Ken Keech, Betty Routhouska, and Nicole L. Fonger

Two high school algebra teachers and their students focused on examining population trends affected by the creation of a highway though a thriving African American community.

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Elizabeth G. Arnold, Elizabeth A. Burroughs, Mary Alice Carlson, Elizabeth W. Fulton, and Megan H. Wickstrom

Ear to the Ground features voices from several corners of the mathematics education world.

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Jennifer M. Bay-Williams

February is considered the love month. Wondering how this got started? There are many theories. Valentine’s Day itself may have resulted from a poem by the English poet Geoffrey Chaucer in 1375 titled “Parliament of Foules." Let’s focus on the meaning of love as a verb: to hold dear, take pleasure in, or thrive in (Merriam-Webster, n.d.). Sadly, far too few students love mathematics and instead feel anxiety or other negative emotions. We must do better. In this month of love, let’s focus on ways we can ensure that each and every child has the opportunities to

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Amanda K. Riske, Catherine E. Cullicott, Amanda Mohammad Mirzaei, Amanda Jansen, and James Middleton

We introduce the Into Math Graph tool, which students use to graph how “into" mathematics they are over time. Using this tool can help teachers foster conversations with students and design experiences that focus on engagement from the student’s perspective.

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Jo Boaler, Tanya LaMar, and Cathy Williams

I (JB) received a message recently that piqued my curiosity—Steve Levitt, a University of Chicago economist, famous for his book Freakonomics, wanted to talk with me. Because my contacts usually come from the world of mathematics and education, I wondered what it was that Steve wanted to discuss. What I did not know at the time was that phone call would be the start of one of the most exciting new initiatives I have encountered in my work in education, which has the potential to significantly change the mathematics we teach in classrooms. Steve became interested in

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Rachel Wiemken, Russasmita Sri Padmi, and Gabriel Matney

Teachers from two countries designed a model-eliciting activity about the global issue of wind energy. They share teaching and student outcomes from a cross-border engagement in the task with students from Indonesia and the United States through synchronous video conference.

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Emily P. Bonner

As I walk down the hallway in East G Elementary School (pseudonyms have been used throughout), a largely African American school with a high population of students living in poverty, I hear chanting coming from Ms. Jacobs’s fifth-grade classroom. Student voices penetrate the usual silence in the school’s passageways as I get closer to the doorway. When I enter the classroom, I see students sitting at large tables in groups of four or five working with whiteboards and reading from “math journals.” A mixed number is up on the board—5 3/4—and students are working to change this mixed number

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LouAnn H. Lovin

Moving beyond memorization of probability rules, the area model can be useful in making some significant ideas in probability more apparent to students. In particular, area models can help students understand when and why they multiply probabilities and when and why they add probabilities.