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Jennifer M. Bay-Williams

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Derek A. Williams, Kelly Fulton, Travis Silver, and Alec Nehring

A two-day lesson on taxicab geometry introduces high school students to a unit on proof.

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Deanna Pecaski McLennan

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Lindsay Vanoli and Jennifer Luebeck

Engaging mathematics students with peers in analyzing errors and formulating feedback improves disposition, increases understanding, and helps students uncover and correct misconceptions while informing opportunities for targeted instruction.

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Susan Ahrendt, Debra Monson, and Kathleen Cramer

Examine fourth graders’ thinking about the unit, partitioning, order, and equivalence on the number line and consider ways to orchestrate mathematical discussions through the Five Practices.

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Nicholas J. Gilbertson

When students encounter unusual situations or exceptions to rules, they can become frustrated and can question their understanding of particular topics. In this article, I share some practical tips.

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Anne Quinn

The paper discusses technology that can help students master four triangle centers -- circumcenter, incenter, orthocenter, and centroid. The technologies are a collection of web-based apps and dynamic geometry software. Through use of these technologies, multiple examples can be considered, which can lead students to generalizations about triangle centers.

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Shiv Karunakaran, Ben Freeburn, Nursen Konuk, and Fran Arbaugh

Preservice mathematics teachers are entrusted with developing their future students' interest in and ability to do mathematics effectively. Various policy documents place an importance on being able to reason about and prove mathematical claims. However, it is not enough for these preservice teachers, and their future students, to have a narrow focus on only one type of proof (demonstration proof), as opposed to other forms of proof, such as generic example proofs or pictorial proofs. This article examines the effectiveness of a course on reasoning and proving on preservice teachers' awareness of and abilities to recognize and construct generic example proofs. The findings support assertions that such a course can and does change preservice teachers' capability with generic example proofs.

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Nicholas J. Gilbertson, Samuel Otten, Lorraine M. Males, and D. Lee Clark

For many American students, high school geometry provides their only focused experience in writing proofs (Herbst 2002), and proof is often viewed as the application of recently learned theorems rather than a means of establishing and understanding the truth of general results (Soucy McCrone and Martin 2009).

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Angeliki Kolovou, Marja van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, and Olaf Köller

This study investigated whether an intervention including an online game contributed to 236 Grade 6 students' performance in early algebra, that is, solving problems with covarying quantities. An exploratory quasi-experimental study was conducted with a pretest-posttest-control-group design. Students in the experimental group were asked to solve at home a number of problems by playing an online game. Although boys outperformed girls in early algebra performance on the pretest as well as on the posttest, boys and girls profited equally from the intervention. Implications of these results for educational practice are discussed.