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Jennifer M. Bay-Williams

February is considered the love month. Wondering how this got started? There are many theories. Valentine’s Day itself may have resulted from a poem by the English poet Geoffrey Chaucer in 1375 titled “Parliament of Foules." Let’s focus on the meaning of love as a verb: to hold dear, take pleasure in, or thrive in (Merriam-Webster, n.d.). Sadly, far too few students love mathematics and instead feel anxiety or other negative emotions. We must do better. In this month of love, let’s focus on ways we can ensure that each and every child has the opportunities to

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Derek A. Williams, Kelly Fulton, Travis Silver, and Alec Nehring

A two-day lesson on taxicab geometry introduces high school students to a unit on proof.

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Deanna Pecaski McLennan

For the Love of Mathematics

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Lindsay Vanoli and Jennifer Luebeck

Engaging mathematics students with peers in analyzing errors and formulating feedback improves disposition, increases understanding, and helps students uncover and correct misconceptions while informing opportunities for targeted instruction.

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Susan Ahrendt, Debra Monson, and Kathleen Cramer

Examine fourth graders’ thinking about the unit, partitioning, order, and equivalence on the number line and consider ways to orchestrate mathematical discussions through the Five Practices.

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Nicholas J. Gilbertson

When students encounter unusual situations or exceptions to rules, they can become frustrated and can question their understanding of particular topics. In this article, I share some practical tips.

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Anne Quinn

The paper discusses technology that can help students master four triangle centers -- circumcenter, incenter, orthocenter, and centroid. The technologies are a collection of web-based apps and dynamic geometry software. Through use of these technologies, multiple examples can be considered, which can lead students to generalizations about triangle centers.

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Anna F. DeJarnette and Gloriana González

Given the prominence of group work in mathematics education policy and curricular materials, it is important to understand how students make sense of mathematics during group work. We applied techniques from Systemic Functional Linguistics to examine how students positioned themselves during group work on a novel task in Algebra II classes. We examined the patterns of positioning that students demonstrated during group work and how students' positioning moves related to the ways they established the resources, operations, and product of a task. Students who frequently repositioned themselves created opportunities for mathematical reasoning by attending to the resources and operations necessary for completing the task. The findings of this study suggest how students' positioning and mathematical reasoning are intertwined and jointly support collaborative learning through work on novel tasks.

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Shiv Karunakaran, Ben Freeburn, Nursen Konuk, and Fran Arbaugh

Preservice mathematics teachers are entrusted with developing their future students' interest in and ability to do mathematics effectively. Various policy documents place an importance on being able to reason about and prove mathematical claims. However, it is not enough for these preservice teachers, and their future students, to have a narrow focus on only one type of proof (demonstration proof), as opposed to other forms of proof, such as generic example proofs or pictorial proofs. This article examines the effectiveness of a course on reasoning and proving on preservice teachers' awareness of and abilities to recognize and construct generic example proofs. The findings support assertions that such a course can and does change preservice teachers' capability with generic example proofs.

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Jessica Pierson Bishop, Lisa L. Lamb, Randolph A. Philipp, Ian Whitacre, Bonnie P. Schappelle, and Melinda L. Lewis

We identify and document 3 cognitive obstacles, 3 cognitive affordances, and 1 type of integer understanding that can function as either an obstacle or affordance for learners while they extend their numeric domains from whole numbers to include negative integers. In particular, we highlight 2 key subsets of integer reasoning: understanding or knowledge that may, initially, interfere with one's learning integers (which we call cognitive obstacles) and understanding or knowledge that may afford progress in understanding and operating with integers (which we call cognitive affordances). We analyzed historical mathematical writings related to integers as well as clinical interviews with children ages 6-10 to identify critical, persistent cognitive obstacles and powerful ways of thinking that may help learners to overcome obstacles.