Browse

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • Professional Development / Teacher Training x
  • Other Topic x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Patrick Sullivan

Draw on two simulations to introduce compound events and help your class make connections between experimental and theoretical probabilities.

Restricted access

Deanna Pecaski McLennan

Restricted access

Amanda K. Riske, Catherine E. Cullicott, Amanda Mohammad Mirzaei, Amanda Jansen, and James Middleton

We introduce the Into Math Graph tool, which students use to graph how “into" mathematics they are over time. Using this tool can help teachers foster conversations with students and design experiences that focus on engagement from the student’s perspective.

Restricted access

Aaron Trocki

The advent of dynamic geometry software has changed the way students draw, construct, and measure by using virtual tools instead of or along with physical tools. Use of technology in general and of dynamic geometry in particular has gained traction in mathematics education, as evidenced in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010).

Restricted access

Robinson Marlene

As we launch the 2012–2013 academic year, we find ourselves positioned for the natural renewal of focus and energy that often accompany presidential election years. We recognize that in addition to the weak economy, state and national reductions to education resources can create their own challenges to the mathematics education community as we adopt common curriculum standards. More than forty U.S. states are collectively endeavoring to meet the challenge of understanding and implementing the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) with fidelity to both the Content and the Mathematical Practices (CCSSI 2010). Other states and regions we serve are also renewing their commitment to quality mathematics instruction and assessment that meets high standards.

Restricted access

Michael J. Bossé and Kwaku Adu-Gyamfi

A geometry course for teachers—easily adaptable to a high school geometry class—integrates technology, reasoning, communication, collaboration, reading, writing, and multiple representations.

Restricted access

Sheldon P. Gordon

In the climactic scene in The Wizard of Oz, Toto draws back the curtain to expose the Wizard of Oz, and Frank Morgan admits, “I am really a very good man but just a poor wizard.” This statement is reminiscent of Arthur C. Clarke's famous third law: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic” (Clarke 1962, p. 36). For almost all students, what happens when they push buttons on their calculators is essentially magic, and the techniques used are seemingly pure wizardry.