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Juli K. Dixon, Treshonda Rutledge, Jennifer C. Caton, and Edward C. Nolan

Constraints for social distancing require teachers to find creative ways to engage students. Consider this fun strategy for exploring fraction equivalence, addition, and subtraction in a game environment where students use self-made or digital manipulatives.

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Karl W. Kosko

Use Cuisenaire™ Rods to emphasize the column-and-row structure in arrays for meaningful multiplication.

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Jennifer Throndsen

This simple dice game supports students' development of flexibility with numbers, the properties of the four operations (+, −, ×, ÷), and the order of operations. It requires only dice and a game board for each player.

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Jessica F. Shumway

Three days of using building blocks significantly enriched second graders' thinking about multiple dimensions.

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Sarah J. Selmer and Kimberly Floyd

A proactive preschool teacher differentiates instruction by using the Universal Design for Learning framework to decrease barriers that limit students' access to classroom learning.

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Pamela Edwards Johnson, Melissa Campet, Kelsey Gaber, and Emma Zuidema

Three preservice teachers used virtual manipulatives during clinical interviews with students of elementary school age. The technology exposed students' problem-solving strategies and mathematical understanding, promoting just-in-time teaching about the target content. The process of completing and reflecting on the interviews contributed to growth of the preservice teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge.

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Trena L. Wilkerson, Tommy Bryan, and Jane Curry

Using candy bars as models gives students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve.

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Katie L. Anderson

Teachers share success stories and ideas that stimulate thinking about the effective use of technology in K–grade 6 classrooms. This article describes a set of lessons where sixth graders use virtual pattern blocks to develop proportional reasoning. Students' work with the virtual manipulatives reveals a variety of creative solutions and promotes active engagement. The author suggests that technology is most effective when coupled with worthwhile mathematical tasks and rich classroom discussions.

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Aimee J. Ellington and Joy W. Whitenack

A mathematics specialist has great success using a pattern-block configuration to help a small group of fifth graders understand that fractional parts of a whole unit must be equal in size. That's just the way the funky cookie crumbles.

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Kathy A. Bacon

Presented with a variety of palatable, inquiry-based, creative learning choices in geometry, this teacher and her fifth graders found tremendous satisfaction in meeting target goals for reasoning skills and taking important “next steps” in learning.