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Sandra M. Linder and Amanda Bennett

This article presents examples of how early childhood educators (prek-2nd grade) might use their daily read alouds as a vehicle for increasing mathematical talk and mathematical connections for their students.

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Zachary A. Stepp

“It's a YouTube World” (Schaffhauser, 2017), and educators are using digital tools to enhance student learning now more than ever before. The research question scholars need to explore is “what makes an effective instructional video?”.

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Liat Zippin

Math by the Month is a regular department of the journal. It features collections of short activities focused on a monthly theme. These articles aim for an inquiry or problem-solving orientation that includes at least four activities each for grade bands K—2, 3–4, and 5–6. In this issue, the problems present opportunities to reason about many mathematical topics, including patterns and grouping, fractions of a set, ratios, and elapsed time.

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Kimberly M. Lilienthal

Collections of short activities, Math by the Month articles aim for an inquiry or problem-solving orientation focused on a unifying theme and include four activities each for grade levels K–2, 3–4, and 5–6. In anticipation of October's Fire Prevention Week, September's problems involve firefighters and real-life math applications.

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Lynn Columba, Thomas Hammond, and Lanette Waddell

What is in a name? Actually, quite a lot of math! Join us as “math by the month” challenges students to apply their knowledge of data analysis, geometry, and algebraic thinking to solve this collection of math problems.

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Lyn D. English, Steve Humble, and Victoria E. Barnes

You, too, can design and implement math trails to promote active, meaningful, real-world mathematical learning beyond your classroom walls.

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Laurie St. Julien

Why would a person who is terrified of cockroaches use them in a math lesson? The idea for this investigation did not occur to me until I read a newspaper article that described Italian scientist Paolo Domenici's research about cockroaches' escape trajectories. In particular, he found that cockroaches have preferred escape trajectories of 90, 120, 150, and 180 degrees from the source of danger (Domenici et al. 2008). Because this real-world information presents a unique problem-solving context for fifth graders to explore angles formed by clockwise and counterclockwise rotations, I overcame my fear of the creatures to develop this investigation.