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Deanna Pecaski McLennan

For the Love of Mathematics

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Amanda K. Riske, Catherine E. Cullicott, Amanda Mohammad Mirzaei, Amanda Jansen, and James Middleton

We introduce the Into Math Graph tool, which students use to graph how “into" mathematics they are over time. Using this tool can help teachers foster conversations with students and design experiences that focus on engagement from the student’s perspective.

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Micah S. Stohlmann

An escape room can be a great way for students to apply and practice mathematics they have learned. This article describes the development and implementation of a mathematical escape room with important principles to incorporate in escape rooms to help students persevere in problem solving.

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Christopher Harrow and Ms. Nurfatimah Merchant

Transferring fundamental concepts across contexts is difficult, even when deep similarities exist. This article leverages Desmos-enhanced visualizations to unify conceptual understanding of the behavior of sinusoidal function graphs through envelope curve analogies across Cartesian and polar coordinate systems.

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D. Bruce Jackson

Given two slices of bread—a problem and the answer—students fill in the fixings: their own mathematics reasoning.

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Shiv Karunakaran, Ben Freeburn, Nursen Konuk, and Fran Arbaugh

Preservice mathematics teachers are entrusted with developing their future students' interest in and ability to do mathematics effectively. Various policy documents place an importance on being able to reason about and prove mathematical claims. However, it is not enough for these preservice teachers, and their future students, to have a narrow focus on only one type of proof (demonstration proof), as opposed to other forms of proof, such as generic example proofs or pictorial proofs. This article examines the effectiveness of a course on reasoning and proving on preservice teachers' awareness of and abilities to recognize and construct generic example proofs. The findings support assertions that such a course can and does change preservice teachers' capability with generic example proofs.

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Jennifer Noll and J. Michael Shaughnessy

Sampling tasks and sampling distributions provide a fertile realm for investigating students' conceptions of variability. A project-designed teaching episode on samples and sampling distributions was team-taught in 6 research classrooms (2 middle school and 4 high school) by the investigators and regular classroom mathematics teachers. Data sources included survey data collected in 6 research classes and 4 comparison classes both before and after the teaching episode, and semistructured task-based interviews conducted with students from the research classes. Student responses and reasoning on sampling tasks led to the development of a conceptual lattice that characterizes types of student reasoning about sampling distributions. The lattice may serve as a useful conceptual tool for researchers and as a potential instructional tool for teachers of statistics. Results suggest that teachers need to focus explicitly on multiple aspects of distributions, especially variability, to enhance students' reasoning about sampling distributions.

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The problem posed in MT August 2011 (vol. 105, no. 1, pp. 62-66) asked readers to consider the two-dimensional version of tipping a bowl (assumed to be a rectangular prism) to spoon out the last little bit of melted ice cream. Here is the essence of the problem: Given a fluid region of fixed area A contained in a rectangle whose width is W, find a formula for the fluid depth D when the container is tilted through a known angle T that is measured from horizontal.

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Tongta Somchaipeng, Tussatrin Kruatong, and Bhinyo Panijpan

Students use balls and disks to prove the general formulas for sums of squares and cubes.

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Timothy McKeny and Joanne Caniglia

Students analyze a photograph to solve mathematical questions related to the images captured in the photograph. This month, the art of sculptor and painter Sol LeWitt is analyzed. Counting, combinatorics, and spatial visualization are among the mathematical themes evinced.