Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • Grades 9-12 x
  • Representations x
  • Reasoning/Sense Making/Proof x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

José N. Contreras

Sequences are an important topic—not only in mathematics but also in the mathematics curriculum. Exploring sequences related to medial triangles offers learners opportunities to solve problems involving sequences within geometric contexts. Sequences related to medial triangles are also a rich source of beautiful and interesting geometric patterns that can be discovered with the use of dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as GeoGebra or Web Sketchpad. In addition, exploring sequences with DGS allows learners to formulate and test conjectures, an important mathematical process. In this article, I describe how my students used GeoGebra and geometric reasoning to visualize, discover, formulate,

Restricted access

Anne Quinn

The paper discusses technology that can help students master four triangle centers -- circumcenter, incenter, orthocenter, and centroid. The technologies are a collection of web-based apps and dynamic geometry software. Through use of these technologies, multiple examples can be considered, which can lead students to generalizations about triangle centers.

Restricted access

J. Matt Switzer

tudents often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and my students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an inequality, students may lack a deep understanding of the relationship between the inequality and its graph. Hiebert and Carpenter (1992) stated that mathematics is understood “if its mental representation is part of a network of representations” and that the “degree of understanding is determined by the number and strength of the connections” (p. 67). I therefore developed an activity that allows students to explore the graphs of inequalities not presented as lines in slope-intercept form, thereby making connections between pairs of expressions, ordered pairs, and the points on a graph representing equations and inequalities.

Restricted access

Marlena Herman and Jay Schiffman

The process of prime factor splicing to generate home primes raises opportunity for conjecture and exploration.

Restricted access

Raymond N. Greenwell and Daniel E. Seabold

The Gale-Shapley algorithm can be used to match partners in a variety of contexts, such as marriage and hospital residencies.

Restricted access

Teo J. Paoletti

This historical—and classroom friendly—approach to the concept of infinity uses Cantor's proofs of cardinality.

Restricted access

Margaret Rathouz, Christopher Novak, and John Clifford

Constructing formulas “from scratch” for calculating geometric measurements of shapes—for example, the area of a triangle—involves reasoning deductively and drawing connections between different methods (Usnick, Lamphere, and Bright 1992). Visual and manipulative models also play a role in helping students understand the underlying mathematics implicit in measurement and make sense of the numbers and operations in formulas.

Restricted access

Dustin L. Jones and Max Coleman

Many everyday objects–paper cups, muffins, and flowerpots–are examples of conical frustums. Shouldn't the volume of such figures have a central place in the geometry curriculum?

Restricted access

Kate Nowak

This is a description of a collaborative investigation by mathematics teachers into the numbers of dimensional boundaries for n > 2. Functions are fit to the patterns observed, and a relationship to Pascal's triangle is noted.

Restricted access

Bethany A. Noblitt and Brooke E. Buckley

Participants race across a university campus, completing challenging mathematical tasks that correspond to NCTM's Standards.