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Sarah Ferguson

Explore the creation of a unique problem-based learning (PBL) experience.

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Rick Stuart and Matt Chedister

While filling three-dimensional letters, students analyzed the relationship between the height of water level and elapsed time.

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Arnulfo Pérez, Bailey Braaten, and Robert MacConnell

A hands-on, project-based modeling unit illustrates how real-world inquiry deepens student engagement with function concepts.

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Erin E. Krupa, Mika Munakata, and Karmen Yu

Can you remember your typical elementary school field day? In this article, we provide details on hosting a mathematics field day, focused on embedding rich mathematics into authentic fun-filled field day experiences.

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Elaine M. Purvinis and Joshua B. Fagan

In first- and second-year algebra classrooms, the all-too-familiar whine of “when are we ever going to use this in real life?” challenges mathematics teachers to find new, engaging ways to present mathematical concepts. The introduction of quadratic equations is typically modeled by describing the motion of a moving object with respect to time, and typical lessons include uninspiring textbook practice problems that portray dropping or shooting objects from given distances or at particular time intervals. For a novel approach to exploring quadratics, we chose to step outside the classroom to look at some phenomena in the field of acoustics. Our activity incorporates mathematical modeling to provide a multirepresentational view of the math behind the physics and to provide a conceptual basis for analyzing and understanding a real-world quadratic situation.

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Edited by Anna F. DeJarnette and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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Michelle L. Meadows and Joanna C. Caniglia

Imagine that you and your language arts colleagues are teaching Edgar Allan Poe's short story, “The Pit and the Pendulum.” This thrilling story takes us to the Inquisition during which a prisoner is surrounded by hungry rats and bound to a table while a large pendulum slowly descends. The prisoner believes that the pendulum is 30-40 feet long and estimates that it should take about 10-12 swings before he is hit, leaving him with about a minute or a minute and a half to escape. Are his estimations correct? If so, will he make it out in time?

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Edited by Anna F. DeJarnette and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.