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Deanna Pecaski McLennan

Use the language of mathematics to explore diversity in kindergarten.

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Amanda M. Dominguez, Marina Feldman, Dan Battey, Christelle Palpacuer Lee, and Jessica Hunsdon

Rethink family mathematics nights by drawing on an asset-based perspective in a virtual environment, centering multilingualism and community mathematics knowledge.

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Ken Keech, Betty Routhouska, and Nicole L. Fonger

Two high school algebra teachers and their students focused on examining population trends affected by the creation of a highway though a thriving African American community.

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Amanda K. Riske, Catherine E. Cullicott, Amanda Mohammad Mirzaei, Amanda Jansen, and James Middleton

We introduce the Into Math Graph tool, which students use to graph how “into" mathematics they are over time. Using this tool can help teachers foster conversations with students and design experiences that focus on engagement from the student’s perspective.

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Tyrone Martinez-Black and Sara K. Rezvi

Ear to the Ground features voices from several corners of the mathematics education world.

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Danny Bernard Martin and Introduction by: Robert Q. Berry III

From the Archives highlights articles from NCTM’s legacy journals, as chosen by leaders in mathematics education.

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Mark Cox

For the Love of Mathematics

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Rachel Wiemken, Russasmita Sri Padmi, and Gabriel Matney

Teachers from two countries designed a model-eliciting activity about the global issue of wind energy. They share teaching and student outcomes from a cross-border engagement in the task with students from Indonesia and the United States through synchronous video conference.

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Emily P. Bonner

As I walk down the hallway in East G Elementary School (pseudonyms have been used throughout), a largely African American school with a high population of students living in poverty, I hear chanting coming from Ms. Jacobs’s fifth-grade classroom. Student voices penetrate the usual silence in the school’s passageways as I get closer to the doorway. When I enter the classroom, I see students sitting at large tables in groups of four or five working with whiteboards and reading from “math journals.” A mixed number is up on the board—5 3/4—and students are working to change this mixed number

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David W. Stinson

This article shows how equity research in mathematics education can be decentered by reporting the “voices” of mathematically successful African American male students as they recount their experiences with school mathematics, illustrating, in essence, how they negotiated the White male math myth. Using post-structural theory, the concepts discourse, person/identity, and power/agency are reinscribed or redefined. The article also shows that using a post-structural reinscription of these concepts, a more complex analysis of the multiplicitous and fragmented robust mathematics identities of African American male students is possible—an analysis that refutes simple explanations of effort. The article concludes, not with “answers,” but with questions to facilitate dialogue among those who are interested in the mathematics achievement and persistence of African American male students—and equity and justice in the mathematics classroom for all students.