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Deanna Pecaski McLennan

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Amanda K. Riske, Catherine E. Cullicott, Amanda Mohammad Mirzaei, Amanda Jansen, and James Middleton

We introduce the Into Math Graph tool, which students use to graph how “into" mathematics they are over time. Using this tool can help teachers foster conversations with students and design experiences that focus on engagement from the student’s perspective.

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Jon D. Davis

Design principles are used to construct and refine a technology-infused lesson for beginning algebra students learning about systems of linear inequalities.

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Leigh Haltiwanger, Robert M. Horton, and Brooke Lance

Making mathematics meaningful is a challenge that all math teachers endeavor to meet. As math teachers, we spend countless hours crafting problems that will energize students and help them connect mathematical topics to their everyday lives. Being successful in our efforts requires that we allow students to explore ideas before we provide explanations and demands that we ask questions to promote a depth of thinking and reasoning that would not occur without such probing (Marshall and Horton 2009).

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Wayne Nirode

Using technology to solve triangle construction problems, students apply their knowledge of points of concurrency, coordinate geometry, and transformational geometry.

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Craig Barton

Students often have difficulty with the topic of straight-line graphs. Perhaps they cannot relate to the abstractness of the concepts involved. Perhaps the sheer number and complexity of the skills required—reading algebra, substituting values, rearranging formulas, dealing with negative numbers, understanding coordinates and fractions—magnifies any misconceptions or weaknesses that students may have in other areas of mathematics, rendering them unable to come to grips with the topic as a whole.

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Rachel Levy

The mathematical concept of slope can be made real through a set of simple, inexpensive, and safe experiments that can be conducted in the classroom or at home. The experiments help connect the idea of slope with physical phenomena related to surface tension. In the experiments, changes in surface tension across the surface of the water, which correspond to greater slopes on the graph, lead to increased motion of the fluid. The mathematical content, targeted to middle school and high school students, can be used in a classroom or workshop setting and can be tailored to a single session of thirty to ninety minutes.

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Wendy B. Sanchez

Educating students—for life, not for tests—implies incorporating open-ended questions in your teaching to develop higher-order thinking.

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Jason Silverman, Gail L. Rosen, and Steve Essinger

Use digital signal processing to capitalize on an exciting intersection of mathematics and popular culture.

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Kelly S. Chrisler

To better prepare students for their future careers, a fifth-grade teacher designs and implements a lesson that uses spreadsheet software to graph functions.