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Chunlian Jiang and Eunmi Joung

Growing Problem Solvers provides four original, related, classroom-ready mathematical tasks, one for each grade band. Together, these tasks illustrate the trajectory of learners’ growth as problem solvers across their years of school mathematics.

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Eric Cordero-Siy and Hala Ghousseini

Three deliberate teaching practices can help students strengthen multiple connections to a unifying concept.

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Surani Joshua, James Drimalla, Dru Horne, Heather Lavender, Alexandra Yon, Cameron Byerley, Hyunkyoung Yoon, and Kevin Moore

The Relative Risk Tool web app allows students to compare risks relating to COVID-19 with other more familiar risks, to make multiplicative comparisons, and to interpret them.

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Madelyn W. Colonnese

A teacher implements this type of personal prose in the classroom to help students make sense of fractions and communicate ideas.

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Noah Brown, Jonathan D. Bostic, Timothy Folger, Laura Folger, Tiara Hicks, and Shay Nafziger

Mathematics assessments should allow all students opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge and skills as problem solvers. Looking at textbook word problems, we share a process for revising them using Universal Design for Learning.

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Sandra Vorensky

Design projects to encourage your students’ self-efficacy and motivate mathematics learning by helping them apply their prior knowledge from real-world experiences.

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Jessica Pierson Bishop, Lisa L. Lamb, Ian Whitacre, Randolph A. Philipp, and Bonnie P. Schappelle

Are your students negative about integers? Help them experience positivity and joy doing integer arithmetic!

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Jere Confrey, Meetal Shah, and Alan Maloney

Three learning trajectories and their connections show how to promote vertical coherence in PK–12 mathematics education.

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Jennifer M. Bay-Williams

February is considered the love month. Wondering how this got started? There are many theories. Valentine’s Day itself may have resulted from a poem by the English poet Geoffrey Chaucer in 1375 titled “Parliament of Foules." Let’s focus on the meaning of love as a verb: to hold dear, take pleasure in, or thrive in (Merriam-Webster, n.d.). Sadly, far too few students love mathematics and instead feel anxiety or other negative emotions. We must do better. In this month of love, let’s focus on ways we can ensure that each and every child has the opportunities to

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Heidi Fee

This article shows how to empower students in their own learning by their own creation of instructional videos and assessment.