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Christopher Harrow and Ms. Nurfatimah Merchant

Transferring fundamental concepts across contexts is difficult, even when deep similarities exist. This article leverages Desmos-enhanced visualizations to unify conceptual understanding of the behavior of sinusoidal function graphs through envelope curve analogies across Cartesian and polar coordinate systems.

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Over the past 100 years, technology has evolved in unprecedented fashion. Calculators, computers, and smart phones have become ubiquitous, yet school mathematics experiences for many children still remain without many powerful technological tools for the exploration of mathematics. We consider the evolution of some tools as we imagine a future.

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Anne Quinn

The paper discusses technology that can help students master four triangle centers -- circumcenter, incenter, orthocenter, and centroid. The technologies are a collection of web-based apps and dynamic geometry software. Through use of these technologies, multiple examples can be considered, which can lead students to generalizations about triangle centers.

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Travis Lemon

NCTM has provided rich resources through the publication of practitioner journals for decades and is now leading the way once again with a digital first dynamic publication focused on the learning and teaching of mathematics. This is a rich opportunity for teachers to engage, to learn and to go.

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Patrick Sullivan

Is the “Last Banana” game fair? Engaging in this exploration provides students with the mathematical power to answer the question and the mathematical opportunity to explore important statistical ideas. Students engage in simulations to calculate experimental probabilities and confirm those results by examining theoretical probabilities

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Shiv Karunakaran, Ben Freeburn, Nursen Konuk, and Fran Arbaugh

Preservice mathematics teachers are entrusted with developing their future students' interest in and ability to do mathematics effectively. Various policy documents place an importance on being able to reason about and prove mathematical claims. However, it is not enough for these preservice teachers, and their future students, to have a narrow focus on only one type of proof (demonstration proof), as opposed to other forms of proof, such as generic example proofs or pictorial proofs. This article examines the effectiveness of a course on reasoning and proving on preservice teachers' awareness of and abilities to recognize and construct generic example proofs. The findings support assertions that such a course can and does change preservice teachers' capability with generic example proofs.