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Edited by Anna F. DeJarnette and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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Jennifer M. Mayer, Mary Ann Huntley, Nicole L. Fonger, and Maria S. Terrell

In a recent Mathematics Teacher article, Fonger and her colleagues explain why teachers should engage in research studies: Researchers working alone lack the information needed to effectively address problems of practice that matter most-problems that are highly contextual and based on teachers' day-to-day experience. (2017, p. 462)

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Michelle L. Meadows and Joanna C. Caniglia

Imagine that you and your language arts colleagues are teaching Edgar Allan Poe's short story, “The Pit and the Pendulum.” This thrilling story takes us to the Inquisition during which a prisoner is surrounded by hungry rats and bound to a table while a large pendulum slowly descends. The prisoner believes that the pendulum is 30-40 feet long and estimates that it should take about 10-12 swings before he is hit, leaving him with about a minute or a minute and a half to escape. Are his estimations correct? If so, will he make it out in time?

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Terri L. Kurz, Mi Yeon Lee, Sarah Leming, and Wendy Landis

Algebraic reasoning is often promoted through an analysis of and generalizations about patterns that appear in mathematics, in nature, or in everyday situations (Driscoll 1999; Kieran 2006; Lee 1996). In accordance with this tendency, the Common Core (CCSSI 2010) emphasizes finding patterns and expressing such regularity in repeated reasoning as an important mathematical practice. NCTM (2000) also recommends that students participate in patterning activities by asking them to describe numeric and geometric patterns; generalize patterns to predict what comes next while providing a rationale for their predictions; and represent patterns in multiple ways, including drawings, tables, symbols, and graphs.

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Haiwen Chu and Leslie Hamburger

Five types of engaging peer-interaction structures can support English learners as they make sense of mathematics and explore important mathematical relationships.

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Angela Marie Frabasilio

Let students find the connecting thread to create, illustrate, and share word problems to bridge school math and real-life math.