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Low Chee Soon

Use freedom of choice to promote students' mathematical flexibility.

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Karen D. Campe

There is a distinction between using technology as a tool for doing mathematical tasks and using it to develop conceptual understanding (Dick and Hollebrands 2011). In this article, the table feature of the TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is used in the second role, enabling students to participate in the reasoning and sense-making process. This article showcases four classroom activities that use tables as a dynamic tool for inquiry, applying numerical representations to algebraic, graphical, and geometric phenomena. Although these activities are presented using the TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculator, other calculator and computer platforms can be employed; see the Teacher Guide in more4U for details.

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Peter Wiles, Travis Lemon, and Alessandra King

Students move from slides, flips, and turns into reasoning about the characteristics of rigid transformations.

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Sarah Ferguson

Explore the creation of a unique problem-based learning (PBL) experience.

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Cacey Wells

Each school year, students enter our classrooms with unique experiences and perspectives that ought to be shared. One year, I noticed a student in our school who used a wheelchair. When I saw how difficult it was for that student to navigate the ramps in our school, I began to think about a trigonometry lesson focused on accessibility. I wanted to use mathematics to explore what life was like—albeit to a minor degree—for those with disabilities. The lesson objective was to explore angles of incline in wheelchair ramps to determine whether such ramps truly offer accessibility.

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MT's letters to the editor department. Readers comment on published articles and share their mathematical interests.

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Brandy Crowley and Tracy Harper

Welcome to A-town! All the residents of A-town have names that start with the letter A! Could you live here? Join these students as they solve problems around their neighborhood. Remember, math is everywhere.

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Annie Perkins and Christy Pettis

Mathematics is sometimes called the science of patterns. Many kinds of patterns can be explored.

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Edited by Brian Carvalho

You may have heard that if you are outside and see a flash of lightning, you can estimate the distance between you and the lightning strike fairly well by counting the number of seconds that pass between the lightning flash and the clap of thunder. The rule of thumb is that for every 5 seconds that pass before you hear the thunder, the lightning strike is 1 mile away.