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Daniel Edelen, Heather Simpson, and Sarah B. Bush

The incorporation of the “M” in STEAM must extend beyond simply a tool to address science and engineering standards (Authors, 2016; NCSM/NCTM, 2018). We present a mathematics- rich STEAM inquiry in which elementary students engaged in solving the issue of homelessness for one family in need.

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Angela T. Barlow

In this commentary, I share my changing perspective of our new journal as I advanced through the process of becoming the inaugural Editor-in-Chief. Within this narrative, I offer insights into the affordances of the new features of the journal and its contents.

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Courtney Starling and Ian Whitacre

Introduce your students to a fun and innovative game to encourage precise communication

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Erin Turner, Amanda T. Sugimoto, Kathleen Stoehr, and Erica Kurz

Research-based strategies are described for supporting students as they mathematize real-world scenarios and create inequalities to model situations and contexts from their own lives.

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Imani Masters Goffney

Postscript items are designed as rich grab-and-go resources that any teacher can quickly incorporate into his or her classroom repertoire with little effort and maximum impact. Increase mathematical confidence by creating ways for students to show they are “smart” in math through Smartness Wordles™, collections of words in graphic representation.

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Melissa D. Gunter

Writing about mathematics holds a wealth of benefits for students. When students are given opportunities to write in math class, it helps develop mathematical thinking and language (Carter 2009; McCarthy 2008; Yang 2005), encourages self-reflection (Carter 2009; Danielson 2010; O'Kelley 2013), and provides a better way to organize ideas (Linhart 2014; Rogers 2014). Many teachers incorporate journaling and other types of reflective writing into their instruction already (Sjoberg, Slavit, and Coon 2004; Sanders 2009), but what about other forms of writing? NCTM states the importance of writing, in that students in the middle grades should be “more explicit about basing their writing on a sense of audience and purpose” (NCTM 2000, p. 62). How can we help students develop this important skill in math class?.

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Holland W. Banse, Natalia A. Palacios, Eileen G. Merritt, and Sara E. Rimm-Kaufman

Eliminate obstacles to effective classroom communication with these research-tested suggestions.

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Margaret Cibes and James Greenwood

Short items from the media focus mathematics appropriate for classroom study.

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Marta Kobiela and Richard Lehrer

We examined the codevelopment of mathematical concepts and the mathematical practice of defining within a sixth-grade class investigating space and geometry. Drawing upon existing literature, we present a framework for describing forms of participation in defining, what we term aspects of definitional practice. Analysis of classroom interactions during 16 episodes spanning earlier and later phases of instruction illustrate how student participation in aspects of definitional practice influenced their emerging conceptions of the geometry of shape and form and how emerging conceptions of shape and form provided opportunities to develop and elaborate aspects of definitional practice. Several forms of teacher discourse appeared to support students' participation and students' increasing agency over time. These included: (a) requesting that members of the class participate in various aspects of practice, (b) asking questions that serve to expand the mathematical system, (c) modeling participation in aspects of practice, (d) proposing examples that create contest (i.e., monsters), and (e) explicitly stating expectations of and purposes for participating in the practice.

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Anna F. DeJarnette and Gloriana González

Given the prominence of group work in mathematics education policy and curricular materials, it is important to understand how students make sense of mathematics during group work. We applied techniques from Systemic Functional Linguistics to examine how students positioned themselves during group work on a novel task in Algebra II classes. We examined the patterns of positioning that students demonstrated during group work and how students' positioning moves related to the ways they established the resources, operations, and product of a task. Students who frequently repositioned themselves created opportunities for mathematical reasoning by attending to the resources and operations necessary for completing the task. The findings of this study suggest how students' positioning and mathematical reasoning are intertwined and jointly support collaborative learning through work on novel tasks.