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Sherry L. Bair and Edward S. Mooney

Mathematical precision means more than accuracy in computation or procedures; it also means precision in language. The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics states, “Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning” (CCSSI 2010, p. 7). In our recent experience in working with teachers and students, we have noticed a trend toward teachers using informal, and often creative, language and terminology in an effort to connect with students and make mathematical procedures easier to remember.

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Mark Pinkerton and Kathryn G. Shafer

An action research study focuses on the teaching strategies used to facilitate Problems of the Week.

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Indigo Esmonde and Jennifer M. Langer-Osuna

In this article, mathematics classrooms are conceptualized as heterogeneous spaces in which multiple figured worlds come into contact. The study explores how a group of high school students drew upon several figured worlds as they navigated mathematical discussions. Results highlight 3 major points. First, the students drew on 2 primary figured worlds: a mathematics learning figured world and a figured world of friendship and romance. Both of these figured worlds were racialized and gendered, and were actively constructed and contested by the students. Second, these figured worlds offered resources for 1 African American student, Dawn, to position herself powerfully within classroom hierarchies. Third, these acts of positioning allowed Dawn to engage in mathematical practices such as conjecturing, clarifying ideas, and providing evidence.

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Kasi C. Allen

Collaboration in the mathematics classroom contributes to student learning as well as strengthened preparation for twenty-first-century professions. However, facilitating group work with teenage students can prove challenging. Three strategies for success are establishing a supportive classroom culture; structuring groups and tasks; and nurturing the effort.

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Kelly Cline, Jean McGivney-Burelle, and Holly Zullo

Voting in the classroom can engage students and promote discussion. All you need is a good set of questions.

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Sarah D. Ledford, Mary L. Garner, and Angela L. Teachey

Interesting solutions and ideas emerge when preservice and in-service teachers are asked a traditional algebra question in new ways.

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Beste Güçler

When communicating mathematical ideas to students, teachers must elaborate explicitly on the elements of their discourse. This article focuses on one instructor's and his students' discourse on limits in a beginning-level calculus classroom.

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J. Bradford Burkman

Three sessions at the Joint Meetings revealed either poor or improving communication between high schools and colleges about what courses colleges want students to take in high school.

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Paul Laumakis

Students bring the real world into the classroom by studying speeding data collected on two Pennsylvania highways.

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Michael J. Bossé and Kwaku Adu-Gyamfi

A geometry course for teachers—easily adaptable to a high school geometry class—integrates technology, reasoning, communication, collaboration, reading, writing, and multiple representations.