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Megan Snow

Understanding what students are thinking sometimes requires immediate action. Here are some quick, easy strategies.

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Annette Ricks Leitze, Stephanie Hodge, Danielle Houser, and Clint Mathews

Animals that are at risk of becoming extinct are called endangered species. They can be very large animals, like a polar bear, or very small, like a monarch butterfly. Learn about several different endangered species by engaging in these math activities.

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The Transamerica Pyramid building, shown in photograph 1, is San Francisco's most distinctive and well-known building. Photograph 2, taken from street level, shows a view looking up to the top of the building. Photograph 3, also taken at street level, shows pyramids incorporated into the overall design of the building.

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A cartoon involving equivalent fractions is coupled with a full-page activity sheet.

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Anna F. DeJarnette and Stephen Phelps

A monthly set of problems is aimed at a variety of ability levels.

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Scott J. Hendrickson, Barbara Kuehl, and Sterling Hilton

This article explores teaching practices described in NCTM's Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All. Student thinking, a learning cycle, and procedural fluency are discussed in this article, which is the second installment in the series.

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David Thompson

For 500 years, dream catchers have been cultural symbols of intrigue worldwide. The most common folkloric design is a 12-point dream catcher. According to Native American legend, the first dream catcher was woven by a “spider woman” to catch the bad dreams of a chief's sick child. Once the bad dreams were caught, the chief's child was healed (Oberholtzer 2012). The basic design has been used for 500 years and is similar to the weaving of a spider's web.

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Allyson Hallman-Thrasher, Courtney Koestler, Danielle Dani, Amanda Kolbe, and Katie Lyday

Through trial and error and ultimate success, students create a graph to model a real-world situation.

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Jacqueline Coomes

Turn a light on the Rectangle Border problem and watch students make connections among multiple representations to better understand structure.