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Kathryn O’Connor, Emma Dearborne, and Tutita M. Casa

A version of math workshop centrally positions students to inquire mathematically.

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Jenise Sexton

Ear to the Ground features voices from various corners of the mathematics education world.

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Nicholas J. Gilbertson

When students encounter unusual situations or exceptions to rules, they can become frustrated and can question their understanding of particular topics. In this article, I share some practical tips.

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Tracy E. Dobie and Eleanor R. Anderson

This article explores how teachers can use the sentence stems “I notice” and “I wonder” to deepen professional conversations with colleagues, both in person and in online spaces.

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Emily P. Bonner

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Amanda Jansen

Ear to the Ground features voices from various corners of the mathematics education world.

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Excerpts from discussion threads on the online MyNCTM community

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Sam Rhodes

Teachers can use the SCAMPER framework to help students understand and appreciate rich mathematical connections in topics such as functions. The framework facilitates critical and creative thinking by allowing students to explore concepts through open mathematics.

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Dane Camp, John Carter,, and David Masunaga

Song parodies are a fun way to engage others with mathematical topics. The challenge, of course, is finding a song and lyrics that fit just right. While teaching together in Honolulu, we stumbled across a popular song that turned out to be a math parody in disguise! You will notice that we have not changed the words, just how the words were displayed. You might want to try singing this yourself or sing along with the YouTube version: https://youtu.be/d1mqNdZ0obA. What do you notice? What do you wonder?

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S. Megan Che, Juliana Utley,, and Stacy Reeder

This article illustrates ways to extend Two Ways into high school mathematics content and advantages of doing so.