Mathematics Teacher Educator

About Mathematics Teacher Educator

 

Mission and Goals

Mathematics Teacher Educator works to build a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The journal provides a means for practitioner knowledge related to the preparation and support of teachers of mathematics to be not only public, shared, and stored, but also verified and improved over time (Hiebert, Gallimore, and Stigler 2002).

 

Mathematics Teacher Educator is a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal for practitioners. Three issues of the journal are published each year. Mathematics Teacher Educator is available to NCTM Premium Members. 

Hiebert, J., Gallimore, R., & Stigler, J. W. (2002). A Knowledge Base for the Teaching Profession: What Would It Look Like and How Can We Get One? Educational Research, 31, 3-15. https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X031005003 

Learning to teach mathematics is a complex endeavor, requiring sustained focus and time. Yet time is especially scarce in elementary teacher education programs, where preservice teachers (PSTs) learn all content areas. Through a collaborative self-study, five teacher educators identified three time-related tensions in elementary mathematics methods courses: (a) teaching mathematics content and pedagogy; (b) connecting theory and practice; and (c) promoting social contexts in teaching mathematics. To address these tensions, we offer three design principles and illustrative examples: (a) addressing multiple goals for each course component; (b) developing PSTs’ dispositions over time; and (c) building on PSTs’ strengths to develop understanding of mathematics. We present a reflection tool to assist mathematics teacher educators in designing their courses to maximize their instructional time.

This article explores one novice mathematics teacher educator’s initial use of the Mathematical Quality in Planning Protocol, an innovative tool that was developed to assist in providing feedback on the mathematical quality of novice mathematics teachers’ lesson plans. The protocol was devised to help mathematics teacher educators bridge the gap between prospective teachers’ mathematical content knowledge and their mathematical content knowledge for teaching. Results of our analysis on an initial use of the protocol point to its potential as a tool to help mathematics teacher educators direct their feedback from being overly focused on the pedagogical aspects of the lesson (e.g., timing, planned activities) to the mathematical content prospective teachers are attempting to teach (e.g., anticipated student solutions, problem-solving strategies).

There is a lack of teacher education materials that develop equity literacy in content courses for preservice secondary mathematics teachers. In response, we created teacher education curriculum materials for introductory statistics that include an integrated focus on developing equity literacy and critical statistical literacy.

In this article, we provide an overview of our materials’ design along with a detailed look at one activity regarding racial demographics and tracking in high school STEM courses. We present evidence regarding the positive impact of these materials on the teacher candidates’ competency, value, and likelihood of applying their equity literacy and critical statistical literacy. Implications for mathematics teacher educators working to develop equity literacy together with content knowledge are discussed.

The spaces we inhabit and the physical communities in which we learn all affect how we come to experience the world, construct what mathematics is to us, and develop how we teach mathematics. In this theory-to-practice article, we discuss why explicitly considering spatial ways of knowing is important in mathematics teacher education. We begin by providing theoretical arguments for the importance of considering space in mathematics education. We then present a rationale for why considering space is so important in mathematics teacher education, specifically discussing links to the practice of teaching mathematics. Examples of how to consider tasks related to spatial justice are provided to help reimagine what an mathematics teacher education task can look like.

MTE is a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal for practitioners in mathematics teacher education that is published three times a year. MTE contributes to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The audience for the journal is broadly defined as anyone who contributes to the preparation and professional development of pre-K–12 pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics. Mathematics teacher educators include mathematics educators, mathematicians, teacher leaders, school district mathematics experts, and others.

Ethics Statement

MTE is committed to the ethical treatment of all involved in the publishing process. 

A guest editor is assigned to manuscripts authored by any individuals who have a conflict of interest with the editorial team. 

We expect manuscript authors to adhere to accepted publushing standards ethics. Authors must accept sole responsibility for the factual accuracy of their contributions and for obtaining permission to use data and copyrighted sources. 

Similarly, we expect reviewers to adhere to ethical reviewer practices. Reviewers should honor the confidentiality and intellectual property of manuscripts, should be respectful in communicating their feedback, and should provide feedback that is honest and unbiased. All communications regarding manuscripts are privileged. Reviewers are expected to report to the editor any conflict of interest, suspicion of duplicate publication, fabrication of data, or plagiarism. 

 

Editorial Board

  • Michael Steele, Editor
  • Kate Johnson, Associate Editor

    Panel Members
  • Alison Castro Superfine, Panel Chair
  • Robert Q. Berry, Panel Member
  • Naomi Jessup, Panel Member
  • Andrew Tyminski, Panel Member
  • Rajeev Virmani, Panel Member
  • Jared Webb, Panel Member
  • Zandra de Araujo, NCTM Board Liason
  • Kristin Lesseig, AMTE Board Liaison
  • Babette Benken, AMTE VP of Publications
  • David Barnes, NCTM Staff Liaison

 Headquarters Journal Staff

  • David E. Barnes, Associate Executive Director
  • Ken Krehbiel, Executive Director
  • Scott Rodgerson, Director of Publications and Creative Services 

Mathematics Teacher Educator Acceptance Rate

The acceptance rate for the Mathemtics Teacher Educator journal is the percentage of submitted articles accepted during three consecutive calendar years; It is calculated by summing the total number of articles accepted (accept, accept with major revisions, and accept with minor revisions) and dividing that number by the total number of articles submitted (new manuscripts and revised manuscripts.) The acceptance rates are shown in the table that follows. 

Three year period Accepted Submitted Acceptance Rate
Jan 2014 - Dec 2016 24 214 11.2%
Jan 2015 - Dec 2017 25 177 14.1%
Jan 2016 - Dec 2018 24 153 15.7%
Jan 2017 - Dec 2019 30 163 18.4%
Jan 2018 - Oct 2020 27 190 14.2%
Jan 2019 - Oct 2021 33 203 16.3%

 

 

 

Call for Submissions to MTE: Perspectives on Practice

Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) has a new article formatPerspectives on Practiceto debut in the September 2022 issue. Perspectives on Practice articles will showcase innovations in a previously published MTE article and describe how it was interpreted, iterated, or improved on in practice. 

Download the Perspectives on Practice Call (PDF). 

What to Write for MTE

The mission of the online journal Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) is to contribute to building a professional knowledge base for mathematics teacher educators that stems from, develops, and strengthens practitioner knowledge. The journal provides a forum for sharing practitioner knowledge related to the preparation and support of teachers of mathematics as well as for verifying and improving that knowledge over time. The journal is thus a tool that uses the personal knowledge that mathematics educators gain from their practice to build a trustworthy knowledge base that can be shared with the profession.

Therefore, all manuscripts should be crafted in a manner that makes the scholarly nature of the work apparent. Toward that end, manuscripts should contain a description of the problem or issue of mathematics teacher education that is addressed, the methods/interventions/tools that were used, the means by which these methods/interventions/tools and their results were studied and documented, and the application of the results to practice (both the authors’ practice and the larger community).

The nature of evidence in a practitioner journal is different from that in a research journal, but evidence is still critically important to ensuring the scholarly nature of the journal. Thus, authors must go beyond simply describing innovations to providing evidence of their effectiveness. Note that effectiveness implies that something is better and not just different as a result of the innovation. In addition, authors should make explicit the specific contribution to our knowledge. Findings should be reported with enough warrants to allow the construction or justification of recommendations for policy and practice.

Manuscript Preparation

Manuscripts should be no longer than 25 pages of text or 6,250 words (exclusive of references). For ease of reading by reviewers, all figures and tables should be embedded in the correct locations in the text. All manuscripts should be formatted according to the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (7th edition). Manuscripts not conforming to these specifications may be returned without review. Please submit manuscripts using the online manuscript submission and review system.

Because MTE is published online-only, authors are encouraged to take advantage of the possibilities of this medium by including items such as student work, videos, applets, hyperlinks, and other items that enhance the manuscript. Appropriate permission for such items must be submitted before a manuscript will be accepted for publication. In addition, color can be used to the extent that it enhances the submission.

Resources

So You Want to Be an MTE Author? A Tool for Writing Your Next MTE Manuscript

 

 

 

Mathematics Teacher Educator (MTE) is a scholarly, peer-reviewed online journal for practitioners. Effective with the 2021 volume year, three issues of this journal are published each year and subscription is included with NCTM Premium Membership.

The primary audience of Mathematics Teacher Educator is practitioners in mathematics teacher education, with practitioner broadly defined as anyone who contributes to the preparation and professional development of pre-K–12 pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics. Mathematics teacher educators include but are not limited to mathematics educators, mathematicians, teacher leaders, school district mathematics experts, and professional development providers. Learn more about MTE now.

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