In a recent Mathematics Teacher article, Fonger and her colleagues explain why teachers should engage in research studies: Researchers working alone lack the information needed to effectively address problems of practice that matter most-problems that are highly contextual and based on teachers' day-to-day experience. (2017, p. 462)

Contributor Notes

Jennifer M. Mayer, Jennifer.Mayer@christiana.k12.de.us, has taught mathematics at Christiana High School in Newark, Delaware, for twentytwo years. She is passionate about fostering a deep understanding of mathematics for all students and increasing student discourse.

Mary Ann Huntley, huntley@math.cornell.edu, leads mathematics outreach activities for grades K-12 students and teachers for the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Her research involves examining the middle and high school mathematics curriculum from various perspectives.

Nicole L. Fonger, nfonger@syr.edu, is an assistant professor of mathematics at Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. She researches students' learning of algebra and the nature of curricular and instructional supports for learning.

Maria S. Terrell, mst1@cornell.edu, recently retired from the Department of Mathematics at Cornell University. Her research focuses on tensegrities and the history of geometrical optics and linear perspective, and she has a keen interest in improving undergraduate mathematics instruction.

(Corresponding author is Mayer Jennifer.Mayer@christiana.k12.de.us)
(Corresponding author is Huntley huntley@math.cornell.edu)
(Corresponding author is Fonger nfonger@syr.edu)
(Corresponding author is Terrell mst1@cornell.edu)
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