Modeling the motion of a speeding car or the growth of a Jactus plant, teachers can use six practical tips to help students develop quantitative reasoning.

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Contributor Notes

Eric Weber, eric.weber@oregonstate.edu, is an assistant professor of mathematics education at Oregon State University in Corvallis. He is interested in how students think about functions of two variables and rate of change of two variable functions as well as how technology can support visualizing advanced mathematical ideas.

Amy Ellis, aellis1@wisc.edu, is an associate professor of mathematics education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is interested in students' learning, particularly in the areas of algebraic reasoning, quantitative reasoning, and proof.

Torrey Kulow, kulow@wisc.edu, is a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is interested in preservice and inservice teacher education, particularly in field placement.

Zekiye Ozgur, zozgur@wisc.edu, is a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is interested in students' learning in the area of quantitative reasoning and proof.

(Corresponding author is Weber eric.weber@oregonstate.edu)
(Corresponding author is Ellis aellis1@wisc.edu)
(Corresponding author is Kulow kulow@wisc.edu)
(Corresponding author is Ozgur zozgur@wisc.edu)
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